BIBLE UNEARTHED FINKELSTEIN PDF

: The Bible Unearthed: Israel Finkelstein, Neil Asher Silberman, Thierry Ragobert: Movies & TV. Simcha said: The Bible Unearthed is a rich informative book that manages to In this iconoclastic and provocative work, leading scholars Israel Finkelstein and. In this iconoclastic and provocative work, leading scholars Israel Finkelstein and its new vision of ancient Israel, The Bible Unearthed offers a fascinating and.

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The Bible Unearthed – Wikipedia

Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. In this groundbreaking work that sets apart fact and legend, authors Finkelstein and Silberman use significant archeological discoveries to provide historical information about biblical Israel and its neighbors.

In this iconoclastic and provocative work, leading scholars Israel Finkelstein and Neil Asher Silberman draw on recent archaeological research to present a dramatic In this groundbreaking work that sets apart fact and legend, authors Finkelstein and Silberman use significant archeological discoveries to provide historical information about biblical Israel and its neighbors.

In this iconoclastic and provocative work, leading scholars Israel Finkelstein and Neil Asher Silberman draw on recent archaeological research to present a dramatically revised portrait of ancient Israel and its neighbors. Challenging the fundamentalist readings of the scriptures and marshaling the latest archaeological evidence to support its new vision of ancient Israel, The Bible Unearthed offers a fascinating and controversial perspective on when and why the Bible was written and why it possesses such great spiritual and emotional power today.

Paperbackpages. Published June 11th by Free Press first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Bible Unearthedplease sign up. Julie Judging by the names of the authors, I’m pretty sure they’re Jewish.

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The Bible Unearthed: Archaeology’s New Vision of Ancient Israel and the Origin of Its Sacred Texts

Lists with This Book. The Bible Unearthed is a rich informative book that manages to deliver a large amount of detail in a highly readable prose that entertains without overwhelming the reader.

The book focuses on the archaeology of the Bronze Age and Iron Age Levant and traces the story that this archaeology unfolds as compared with the accounts given in the Hebrew Bible.

Despite the subject matter, however, the authors do not appear to have any particular axe to grind and would seem to be more interested in discussi The Bible Unearthed is a rich informative book that manages to deliver a large amount of detail in a highly readable prose that entertains without overwhelming the reader.

Despite the subject matter, however, the authors do not appear to have any particular axe to grind and would seem to be more interested in discussing what the current evidence tells us or, in many cases, merely suggests to us rather than trying to make it fit any particular pet theory about the history of the Levant.

While the authors do convincingly argue that the archaeological record reveals a history of the Biblical kingdoms of Israel and Judah that often departs from the accounts given in the Deuteronomistic history, they do not present this information as part of any agenda to debunk or rebut the Bible – at least, not beyond the acknowledgment that there is really no evidence to support a strictly literal interpretation of the “historical” information provided in the Bible.

As the authors note in closing: The power of the biblical saga stems from its being a compelling and coherent narrative expression of the timeless themes of a people’s liberation, continuing resistance to oppression, and quest for social equality. It eloquently expresses the deeply rooted sense of shared origins, experiences, and destiny that every human community needs in order to finkellstein.

In short, this is a book which should appeal to anyone with any interest in the history of the Biblical Levant who is not already thoroughly invested in the belief that the Bible can only be viewed through the prism of a strictly literal and inerrant historicity. This book would be better known and more controversial if uneartned was not so dry in its finkelsteinn. Basically it says that there is no archaeological evidence to support the Biblical unerthed of the birth of the Jewish faith–which, of course, knocks the pins out from under Christianity and Islam as well, since all three great world religions essentially look to the Old Testament and believe in the same God.

Whether one believes or disbelieves the premise, this is fascinating stuff for anyone interest This book would be better known and more controversial if it was not so dry in its presentation. Whether one believes or disbelieves the premise, this is fascinating stuff for anyone interested in the history of religion. View all 5 comments. Jan 30, A. When reading the Bible, you’re not engaging in an activity ‘normal people’ do with their ‘normal books.

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It’s something out of place in our time, out of context. Produced in a literary world unlike our own, it’s not strictly history and not strictly fiction.

IBSS – The Bible – The Bible Unearthed

The challenge of understanding which is which, or when and why it was written is pretty well insurmountable with the helping hand of modern archaeology, but a damned nightmare without it.

Archaeologist When reading the Bible, you’re not engaging in an activity ‘normal people’ do with their ‘normal books. Archaeologists Israel Finkelstein and Neil Silberman have put their heads together to provide the common man a survey of recent findings on the historicity of the Old Testament. What they have to offer is probably not a shock to scholars in the field, but it will be a fundamentalist nut shot.

The picture of ancient Israel is different today than it was to us even a hundred years ago, and vastly different than the world the Bible portrays.

Having dispensed with the fantastic legends of wandering wilderness hordes fleeing Egypt and lighting military campaigns through Canaan, the actual history of Israel unfolds very differently when looked at through the ruins.

Finkelstein and Silberman present firm challenges to more generally accepted popular notions. There is no evidence to suggest that a mass exodus of Hebrew slaves two million strong piled into Canaan one day as it would have come as quite a surprise to the string of Egyptian army fortifications already in the country at the time. In fact, it seems now that what became Israel emerged naturally out of the existing population. Further on, if David ruled from Jerusalem, he did so from what amounted to little more than a hilltop village, later transformed in the minds of Judahite authors into the seat of a United Monarchy.

And the monotheism it represented was more likely a later development around the time the Torah was being composed. These and other iconoclastic revelations weave together ‘Archaeology’s new vision of ancient Israel and the origin of its sacred texts. The Bible Unearthed is not an overly challenging read.

Written for an audience not already versed in biblical history or scholarship, it presents the biblical version of events and then attempts to address the level of accuracy——which differs throughout——with the help of archaeological findings.

Finkelstein and Silberman draw on a wealth of sources from the ancient Near East, illuminating their theories with the best evidence available. The whole truth may never be known about any ancient civilization, but through science we can glimpse that world, and hopefully then come to a better understanding of it.

Dec 29, Lyn Elliott rated it it was amazing Shelves: This has been a fascinating excursion into the ancient history of Israel, Judah and the emergence of the Jewish people as an identifiable group who emerged from all the peoples of Canaan. Matching the archaeological record with the historical narratives of the bible, the authors show that much of what the so-called Abrahamic religions Christianity, Islam and Judaism itself hold as central stories of creation, settlement, exile and Exodus from Egypt were written in about the 7th century BC and This has been a fascinating excursion into the ancient history of Israel, Judah and the emergence of the Jewish people as an identifiable group who emerged from all the peoples of Canaan.

Matching the archaeological record with the historical narratives of the bible, the authors show that much of what the so-called Abrahamic religions Christianity, Islam and Judaism itself hold as central stories of creation, settlement, exile and Exodus from Egypt were written in about the 7th century BC and wove together myth, oral history and doctrine to support the Jewish state of Judah.

The great buildings of David and Solomon referred to in the Bible do not date from the eras at which those kings probably lived, but from periods of Assyrian occupation.

There is no evidence of early enslavement in Egypt at the time it was supposed to happen, and no evidence of the conquest of Canaan by the Jews after Moses, And so on. Finkelstein and Silberman are deeply interested in the emergence of an identifiable Jewish culture in something like its modern form – and this dates to the written codification of the Pentateuch and in particular the Deuteronomic histories of the 7th century BC.

They end the main part of the book there are extensive appendices by saying that ‘the Bible’s integrity and, in fact, its historicity, not not depend on any particular “proof” of any of its particular events or personalities.

In specific historical terms, we now know that the Bible’s epic saga first emerged as a response to the pressures, difficulties, challenges and hopes faced by the tiny kingdom of Judah in the decades before its destruction and the even tinier Temple community in Jerusalem’ in the period after the exile in Babylon. One of the most interesting things for me was to see how the history of rise and fall of kings was linked retrospectively to their adherence to the single-god doctrine that finally came to be the dominant form of Jewish worship.

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Good king believer in one God and destroyer of idols and the country prospers; bad king worships other gods and allows others to do so and the land is invaded and suffers. Highly recommended for anyone interested in the ancient or modern history of the Middle East, and the history of religion. Jul 24, Sean rated it really liked it Shelves: Bible plus archaeology equals a rip-snortin’ romp through centuries of dogma, tradition, and guesstimations writ in stone.

No axes to grind to be found here, but if you’re a Literalist, this probably isn’t for you.

Most others will learn a lot. Mar 12, Caslon rated it it was amazing. I really enjoyed this book. It is well written and moves along nicely. Using the scientific facts of archaeology in Isreal, it pulls the rug right out from Kings David and Solomon, and replaces it with an understanding of what really happened, where the Isrealis really came from, and why was the Old Testament written the way it was if it isnt the truth.

Sep 14, Kevin K rated it it was amazing Shelves: I’ve been a fan for some years of Werner Keller’s The Bible as Historyand it still has a lot of good material on the archaeology of the Bible. But Finkelstein and Silberman take the scholarship into the 21st century. A tremendous amount of archaeology has been done in Israel since Keller’s book was written s and last revised early s. This allows Finkelstein and Silberman to overturn many of Keller’s conclusions, and provide definitive answers to many of the core mysteries about the Old Testament.

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Who were the first Israelites and where did they come from? Did the Exodus really happen? Did Joshua actually invade and conquer Canaan? Were Solomon and David great kings who ruled a powerful and united Kingdom of Israel?

Why was the Bible written? Whose interests was it meant to further? All these topics are addressed, and settled in a very convincing way. Apparently, there has been some controversy about the conclusions of this book, and I’d like to read some of those criticisms to get a more rounded view. But if you are interested in the Old Testament, this book will transform your view of it, and take your insight to a much deeper level.

Fineklstein presentation by two Israeli scholars of the lack of archeological evidence supporting the Bible as an historical account, and the large amount of evidence contradicting the Biblical account of history.

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The authors’ hypothesis of the Biblical account’s origins and motives is separate from this overwhelming amount of data pointing to the Bible as largely historical fiction. View all 4 comments. Oct 12, George Polley rated it it was amazing. First published inArchaeologists Israel Finkelstein and Neil Asher Silberman’s fine book will challenge people with an orthodox view of the Bible because, as the archaeological record shows, many of the events recorded in it,did not take place quite as the narrative says.

As Finkelstein and Silberman — both archaeologists — show, the archaeological record tells a very different story from the traditionally accepted one. Their story is more believable and, as it turns out, more accurate tha First published inArchaeologists Israel Finkelstein and Neil Asher Silberman’s fine book will challenge people with an orthodox view of the Bible because, funkelstein the archaeological record shows, many of the events recorded in it,did not take place quite as the narrative says.

Archaeology shows that they could not be, because there is no record of them where and when there should be. The biblical saga finkwlstein woven together from myth, folktale, origin and hero stories, songs and poetry from different times creating a story that met the political needs of specific times. This is not a point of view that will go down well with fundamentalists who insist on making science conform to their literalistic reading of the Bible as accurate history. And in ancient times, myth and factual finkelshein were more often interwoven than not.

Reading the Bible this way, it is easy to place various parts of the narrative within their historic context such as specific dress and dietary rules rather than having to see them as truths-for-all-time-and-all-people, as the literalists see them.