BRUNO LATOUR ARAMIS PDF

Packet switching works well for moving data — why not use it for moving humans? In a nutshell, the French Aramis transit project proposed packet switching as a. This book was originally published as Aramis, l’amour des Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data. Latour, Bruno. [Aramis. I:onglish]. Aramis. Aramis is a very high tech automated subway that was developped in France during the 80s; after its sudden demise, an investigation has been requested in the.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Aramis, or the Love of Technology by Bruno Latour. A guided-transportation system intended for Paris, Aramis represented a major advance in personal rapid transit: But in the end, its electronic couplings proved too complex and expensive, the political will failed, and the project died in The story of Aramis is told by several different par A guided-transportation system intended arzmis Paris, Aramis represented a major advance in personal rapid transit: The story of Aramis is told by several different parties, none of which take precedence over any other: Paperbackpages.

Published by Harvard University Press first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Aramis, or the Love of Technologyplease sign up. Be the first to ask a question about Aramis, or the Love of Technology. Lists with This Book. Jan 17, Elizabeth rated it really liked it Shelves: I was inordinately hesitant to dive into this book, which had been billed to me bryno “Bruno Latour at his weirdest.

This was partially right, as there btuno indeed sections of the book in which Aramis was allowed to speak. However, these sections were balanced by extensive accounts of Latour, his mentor, direct quotes from I was inordinately hesitant to dive into this book, which had been billed to me as “Bruno Latour at his weirdest.

However, these sections were balanced by extensive accounts of Latour, his mentor, direct lattour from interview subjects, and long selections from official documents. I honestly can’t believe I was never assigned to read this in any of my coursework, as it seems like it would be a natural fit into any methods course and would add so much to traditional methods readings, which are inordinately dry and dull considering, in my case, they are meant to describe ethnography.

Moreover, I’m sort of sad that this mode of producing ethnography never really caught on. It’s far less teleological than most. Feb 26, Rosemary rated it it was amazing. In grad school, I studied how science and technology are altered by and alter our perceptions of reality. I read this book 3 times and each time I found new ideas floating in this love story on rumination about a failed technology.

Oct 08, Ulas Tuerkmen rated it really liked it.

Aramis tells the story of the birth and death of a high-tech public transportation project. The story is told not only from the viewpoint of reports on the failure of the project, but also from the viewpoint of Aramis itself, also mixing in expositions on the nature of technology, and interviews with the main actors in what appears to be a really complicated affair. The conundrum the author is after: Why did such a promising project, into which millions of francs were invested in ltour years, and p Aramis tells the story of the birth and death of a high-tech public transportation project.

Why did such a promising project, into which millions of francs were invested in 13 years, and positive reports of progress were written in regular intervals, suddenly get cancelled without getting deployed anywhere?

Bruno Latour’s “Aramis or the love of technology” – Critical commentary

The answer lies, according to Latour, in te nature of high-tech innovation. Before they become “objects” that are out there and used by people, technological visions are vaguely overlapping fields of interest through which different groups aim to achieve different things.

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As the subject of the project becomes ‘objectified’ more and more, these fields converge through compromises and realignments. In the case of Aramis, the RER, RATP, ministry of transport and the realizing company each had different interests, but assumed that the technology created would carry the project forward, giving it a reason to exist and a momentum.

What they forgot, or didn’t care about,according to Latour, was the fact that before becoming objects,technological entities need love and caring from their creators.

Aramis, or the Love of Technology – Wikipedia

Specifically, they have to be argued for, represented, taken sides with etc. Latour makes this point regarding the love affair between a technological creation and its creator through comparisons with Frankenstein, the prototypical creator vs.

Latour tries to depict what he calls ‘the mush of innovation’ through wramis use of multiple voices and perspectives, including the brunk voice of the reporters, excerpts from interviews, heartfelt complaints from Aramis itself, and dialogues between Dr.

Frankenstein and his creation. Because of this varied mixture, and the frequent change of voices, in the end, the book becomes a mush itself, with the reader losing sight of what she is reading now, and what purpose it serves in understanding innovative technological research. What I found particularly annoying were the romantic passages from the voice of Aramis and Frankenstein’s monster.

Interspersed between the earthly engineering discussions and pragmatic business calculations, these monologues were a huge distraction. Thanks to Latour’s observational acumen and sociological insights,however, the book is full of interesting points on the nature of innovation and research.

Regarding big and complicated projects,Latour points out that these are impossible to separate into neat stages that can be completed one after the other, because the outcome is a matter of negotiation itself. Because of this, the project is always in that narrow strait between dead and close to completion.

Aramis, or the Love of Technology

It is very difficult to gauge whether what has been established is just the basics, or the grunt of the work, leaving only the details. This is very similar to the software developers’ mantra “”The first 90 percent of the code accounts for the first 90 percent of the development time; the remaining 10 percent of the code accounts for the other 90 percent of the development time”.

Another interesting point concerns the relationship between common sense and innovation. Once they are produced, innovative objects are ‘perfect’: Their initial conception or an imperfect copy is what you hold in your hand, and it had to be this way if you look at the function of the object in a sensible light, or so the story goes. This is far from the truth when one pays attention to how they are brought to being.

Innovations create common sense, building it along the way. An innovation that doesn’t invent common sense is an oxymoron. All in all, Aramis or the love of technology is a very valuable read for anyone who builds technological objects, even though it’s a bit difficult to follow and ‘novelistic’ for its own good. This a weird book in which Latour mixes sociological commentary proper with a lot of excerpts from official documents and interviews, all contained in a novel-like narrative framework: Well, it a was public transportation project in France which lasted for about two decades, but never came to fruition, despite the hundreds of millions of francs This a weird book in which Latour mixes sociological commentary proper with a lot of excerpts from official documents and interviews, all contained in a novel-like narrative framework: Well, it a was public transportation project in France which lasted for about two decades, but never came to fruition, despite the hundreds of millions of francs spent on it.

The fact that the student is an engineer and the professor a sociologist, allows Latour to sketch two conflicting one might say even opposite views on the same topic. Aramis seems like an utopian kind of transportation, a hybrid between public and private transportation I suggest you google about it and PRTbut engineers worked on it for two decades and deemed it possible.

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So why didn’t it work out? The book is interesting as an investigation: It is also interesting in the way Latour uses the case to argue the usefulness and suitability of his new kind of sociology, mostly centred around the actor-network theory. The structure brruno the book is perhaps experimental and it may not please many people: Engineers will be annoyed by the sociological commentary, sociologists by the tonnes I mean it of technological details.

Lay readers will the find the latter parts of the text overwhelming and the former not serious. The ideas in the book are also repetitive, but intentionally so, and I think the dialogue between the student latokr the professor is stretched in terms of ideas and positions. The characters and their interaction are obviously only a vehicle for Latour’s ideas like in a fable where everything is simply meant to build up to a certain lesson, the moralethat it’s hard to take them seriously.

So, a weird book, a only partly successful experiment, but still interesting especially if you get past the first pages, which might be difficult. I liked it as an investigation proper and also as a model or guide for research and unconventional theorizing. The Aramis book is a meta dialog by a sociologist about the development of a technology, how project structure, etc.

It begins with the question “Who killed Aramis the project? As they say ‘the journey is the reward’ and in this book that’s really where the meat is. The analysis of how the people involved in the project s The Aramis book is a meta dialog by a sociologist about the development of a technology, latoug project structure, etc.

The analysis of how the people involved in the project shifted position, changed their own description of their attitude toward the technology, is particularly revealing.

Very political from the start, the Aramis project’s fortunes were more determined by patronage than by consumer concern.

The Aramis system is a form of “Personal Rapid Transit” and I brkno further online reading links in delicious under the keywords transportation and prt. Dec 03, Greig rated it it was ok. I found this rather disappointing. I’m fairly familiar with Latour’s ideas ANT, agency of objects etc. I’ve decided to try and read more of his famous books, and this was the first I came upon.

It began well, but soon just seemed to get very repetitive with him belaboring each point. It seems to me that there were some pretty serious flaws in the arguments presented in this book and I remain unconvinced by the value of ANT I found this rather disappointing.

Aramis, or the Love of Technology by Bruno Latour

It seems to me that there were some pretty serious flaws in the arguments presented in this book and I remain unconvinced by the value of ANT. Perhaps I’m just dumb, but his points seem to be rather obvious and often seem to be simply ‘language games’. Maybe when he wrote this his ideas were really original. I guess I should try the Pasteurization of France before I give up on him!

Apr 29, June rated it did not like it. I was expecting more philosophy, but this bguno really a book about ARAMIS–the French personal rapid transit project brkno never came to fruition. Now I know basically everything about personal rapid transit–particularly non-material couplings Jan 23, Amna Mahder Bashi rated it it was amazing Shelves: Such an interesting read!

Why do some engineering projects fail miserably? Latour investigates the “death” of Aramis, the expensive and unrealized engineering dream that was once the hope of revolutionizing Parisienne transportation. Feb 02, Siri H.